Topic: COTTON SOFT JAPANESE CHEESE CAKE


Irene    -- 07-20-2004 @ 2:35 PM
  This cheesecake really live up to its name. It is very light and soft. My family and friends like it and hope you do too.

Happy Baking,
    Irene


COTTON SOFT JAPANESE CHEESECAKE

140g / 5 ozs fine granulatd sugar
6 egg whites
6 egg yolks
1\4 tsp cream of tartar  
50g / 2 ozs butter
250g / 9 ozs cream cheese      
100 ml / 3 fluid ozs fresh milk
1 tbsp lemon juice
60g / 2 ozs cake flour /superfine flour
20g / 1oz cornflour
1/4 tsp salt

1.Melt cream cheese, butter and milk over a double boiler. Cool the mixture.Fold in the flours, egg yolks, lemon juice, 1/4 tsp salt and mix well.

2.Whisk egg whites with cream of tartar until foamy.Add in the sugar and whisk until soft peaks form.

3.Add the cheese mixture to the egg white mixture and mix well. Pour into a 8 inch round cake pan ( Lightly grease and line the bottom and sides of the pan with greaseproof baking paper or parchment paper.)

4. Bake cheesecake in a water bath for 1 hours 10 minutes or until set and golden brown at 160 C (325 F)


This message was edited by Irene on 1-8-08 @ 7:49 PM


diana    -- 07-21-2004 @ 9:55 AM
  Hi Irene,

Thank you for the recipe for "Cotton Soft Japanese Cheesecake". It sounds very nice.

I have one question though, when you bake it in an 8-inch cake pan, do you remove the cheesecake after cooling or chilling it and if so, how do you remove it as you didn't state whether the pan should have a removable bottom or that the pan should be a springform pan with side release.

Thank you again and I hope to hear back from you soon.



Sincerely, Diana
Diana's Desserts


Irene    -- 07-22-2004 @ 11:37 PM
  Hello Diana,
  This cheesecake not only sound nice but it taste great too. As for your question. After baking let the cake rest for about 5 minutes before removing it and put it on a wire rack to cool.

  I suppose you can used a springform if you have one but not many people own a springform pan. As for a removeable bottom cake pan I am afraid when you put in the steam bath water might seep in.

   In the recipe you are asked to grease and line the bottom and sides of the pan with greaseproof baking paper or parchment paper. This will make it easier to remove the cake from the pan.  

  Happy Baking,
     Irene


diana    -- 07-23-2004 @ 7:30 AM
  Hi Irene,

Thanks for answering my questions about removing the cheesecake from the pan.

Should the cheesecake chill in the refrigerator before serving and for how long if so?

Sincerely, Diana
Diana's Desserts


Irene    -- 07-23-2004 @ 9:00 AM
  The recipe didn't ask to chill the cheesecake before serving so I did't chill it but I think you can if you wanted. But if I have leftover then only I will put it in the refrigerator.

I have one question to ask you. Is cheesecake usually chilled before serving? Thanks

   Happy Baking'
       Irene


diana    -- 07-23-2004 @ 10:05 AM
  Irene,

Yes, cheesecake is always kept chilled after it has been baked and cooled completely. It is always served chilled right from the refrigerator. Also, keeping it in refrigerator for at least 4 hours or overnight (after cooled at room temperature for an hour or so after being baked) lets the cheesecake set and firm up.

Thanks for the information on the pan lining, etc. too!



Sincerely, Diana
Diana's Desserts


Mei    -- 09-04-2004 @ 3:24 AM
  Hi Irene,
I have just tried out ur cake n it didn't turn out well. I got a hard yellowish uneven texture at the middle of the cake and some part of it was fine n soft just like in the picture. What could be the reason for this? May be i didn't mix well enough during the folding process? However the cake tasted nice. Please advice asap....thanks.

Mei


mgriffin    -- 09-06-2004 @ 5:44 AM
  Hi everyone

Although I have not tried this recipe of Irene's, I have more than a couple of times successfully baked another Cheese cake(Marbled cheesecake - Irene's recipe - but don't know if it is the same Irene).

In answer to Diana's question of whether you can use removeable bottom, yes, I use it and the cake turns out fine. The water does not get into the cheesecake.

Also, I only use parchment paper on the bottom of the cake tin and not the sides.

The other thing is that when I bake my cheesecake, I usually leave it in the oven for a few hours to cool off and the cake will then naturally shrink a little from the sides of the pan, thus not needing the paper at the sides!

And yes, I also put the cake into the fridge for it to firm up.

Kind regards
Tina


Irene    -- 09-06-2004 @ 1:52 PM
  Hi Mei,
  I am sorry to hear that the cheesecake you baked didn't turn out well. I think the most important thing when baking this cake is the whisking of the egg whites. You must whisk until soft peaks are form and not until stiff. If the egg whites mixture is too stiff, it will not blend well with the cream cheese mixture. Do let us know the outcome if you try again. Thanks

  Happy Baking,
     Irene


Irene    -- 09-06-2004 @ 2:02 PM
  Hi Tina,
Thanks for trying the Marble Baked Cheesecake. I am glad it always turn out well. You should try this Cotton Soft Japanese Cheesecake. It taste even better. If you do ever try it I hope you will let us know how it turn out. Thanks

  Happy Baking,
     Irene


Mei    -- 09-06-2004 @ 7:52 PM
  Hi Irene,
Yesterday i baked this cake again n it turned out well. No more hard yellowish texture at the middle. I mixed it more evenly this time but the texture was not as soft as the previous one. Like u said, may be i should whisk the egg whites till soft n not stiff. Thanks for ur advice. By the way, do u have a baked blueberry cheesecake recipe to share? I would love to try. Hope to get ur feedback soon. Best Regards!

Mei


Kris    -- 11-16-2004 @ 11:13 AM
  Hi Irene,

Thank you for the wonderful recipe. I tried it for the first time last night and it turned out beautifully, so soft and light just like you said. I followed the suggestion to beat egg whites till just soft and use room temperature instead of hot for the water bath. To top it off, I spread glaze of apricot on it. This cake is definately on top of my list! Wink

Japanese Cheesecake Pic

Cheers,
Kris


Irene    -- 11-20-2004 @ 5:53 AM
  Hi Kris
Thanks for trying out this recipe and am very happy to know that it turned out beautifully. Have you try out the Marble Baked Cheesecake? It taste just as good.

How about you? Why don't you share with us some of your recipes. Saw the pictures you posted and they look so tempting.Your Lemon Herb Chicken looks delicious and the cream puff look good.
My daughter like the Chocolate Ribbon Cookies. I am sure all of us will appreciate if you can share the recipes with us. Thanks

  
Happy Baking,
    Irene


Kris    -- 12-01-2004 @ 12:37 AM
  Hi again Irene,

I have to let you know that since I posted the last comment, I've made 3 more of those cheesecakes! haha Smile  I recently baked it for thanksgiving instead of traditional pumpkin pie. Big Hit!!

I'm a novice baker and like to experiment with new recipes. I got the recipe for the Chocolate Ribbon Cookies you saw on my photo album through MSN website. Your daughter will have much fun making them too. As for the cream puffs, it's really simple! Let me share it on a new topic.

And to Diana, I simply love your website! There isn't many websites out there with picture to every recipe and yours are all mouth watering. Playful


Cheers,
Kris


May    -- 04-13-2005 @ 8:58 PM
  Hi,

I have just tried the recipe 2 days ago.  It tastes really good.. But I noticed that when the cake is cooled, the surface of the cake gets really wrinkled..  Is it because I had left the cake in my microwave/convention oven to cool..(with oven door closed)?  What should I have done?  Can someone advise me.

Thanks and regards,
May



This message was edited by May on 4-13-05 @ 11:17 PM


Shimul    -- 04-21-2005 @ 7:58 AM
  I have not made this recipe, but when I normally make cheesecakes, I let them cool in the oven for about an hour with the door open and then stick them in the fridge or freezer after that. Not sure if this will prevent the wrinkling, but worth a try.

- Shimul


Irene    -- 04-21-2005 @ 9:57 AM
  Hello May,
Thanks for trying the cheesecake. I do not really know the reason why the surface of your cake gets really wrinkled. Maybe it is because you have your cheesecake in the oven for too long. I usually remove mine from the oven immediately after baking.


By the way, did you see the cheesecake Kris posted at Japanese Cheesecake Pic. If you haven't please do take a look. She baked one very beautiful Cotton Soft Japanese Cheesecake.

Happy Baking
   Irene

p/s Maybe Diana can give us an answer as to why the surface of the cheesecake get so wrinkled.


Irish    -- 05-01-2005 @ 9:23 AM
  Hi Irene, Ive tried this cheesecake twice now and im still having the same problem.. the top half of the cheesecake is great.. very light and fluffy but the bottom half is very heavy (the texture is hard) .. what im i doing wrong..? ive used hot water for the water bath and lukewarm warm too, ensured the egg whites are just soft peaks.. can anyone help..?


Irene    -- 05-01-2005 @ 6:48 PM
  Hello Irish,
Thank you for trying out the recipe. In this recipe you have to use room temperature instead of hot or lukewarm water for the water bath. If you do try again do let us know the outcome. Thanks


May    -- 05-15-2005 @ 4:34 AM
  Hi Irene & Shimul,

I just tried the recipe again today.  think the effect is better. Not as wrinkled. I took the cake out of the oven immediately after it is done, and out of the water bath to cool on the rack. Thank so much for your advise. Smile

Many thanks,
May



This message was edited by May on 5-15-05 @ 5:07 AM


Jenniefrances    -- 05-16-2005 @ 10:42 PM
  Hi Irene,
I've baked your cheesecake quite a few times now, but it doesnt always turn out fluffy, what flour do you use ? I used plain four as opposed to self raising flour. Does 'cake flour' have baking powder in it ? We can only buy plain or self raising flour in Australia although I do have sponge flour and Hong Kong flour.
Thanks,
Jennie


Irene    -- 05-17-2005 @ 10:22 AM
  Hi Jennie,
  Thank you for trying the cheesecake but sorry to hear that it doesn't always turn out the way you wanted it to be. I used the superfine flour for this cheesecake and if you can't find it in Perth you can try using Hong Kong flour instead.Cake flour does not contain any baking powder.

Do let us know the outcome if you do try it again. Thanks.

By the way, have you try the Marble Baked Cheesecake. This cheesecake is easy to bake and plain flour is used instead of superfine flour.Try it someday. You can view a photo of this cheesecake at Diana's Homepage under "Guest Recipe Book"



Happy Baking,
    Irene


Jenniefrances    -- 05-17-2005 @ 5:56 PM
  Hi Irene,
Thanks for your quick reply.
I will try using the hong kong flour. We don't have superfine flour here, I think it is something you can only get in Malaysia/Singapore ?
Also I think I don't always use tap water for the water bath, I think the last time I baked it I used hot water. Also, the last time I baked it, I forgot to leave the eggs out of the fridge to get them to room temperature. There was one time I baked it that it turned out very fluffy, I can't remember the condidtions !!
Anyway, I have printed out the marble cheesecake recipe and will give it a go.
Thanks again,
Jennie


stevenson    -- 05-23-2005 @ 4:39 PM
  Hi everyone !

Sorry I'm beginner in bakery ! but i do love japanese cheescake very much !

Can you please explain to me how to make a water bath ?! and what for ??

Thanks in advance

hi !


SanLim    -- 09-30-2005 @ 10:03 AM
  Hi, I have tried the cheese cake. It tastes excellent. But I have problems cutting the cake. It crumbles and doesn't come in nice slices. What could be the cause?

Enjoy Baking!


Irene    -- 09-30-2005 @ 10:00 PM
  The cheesecake has to be cool completely before cutting. Cheesecake can be kept chilled after it has been baked and cooled completely. It can be served chilled right from the refrigerator. Keeping in the fridge overnight or at least 4 hours will let the cheesecake set and firm up. Although cutting cheesecake is quite straightforward, there are a few tricks to achieving perfect slices.

Here is a step-by-step process that, with a little practice, will yield even slices.

One trick to cutting cheesecake neatly is keeping the knife in use clean and smooth. To do this, fill a tall container with hot tap water deep enough to cover the blade of your knife. Dip the knife into the hot water, and then wipe it on a clean towel before making every cut. The constant dipping and cleaning will prevent chunks of cake from the previous slice from depositing on top of the next slice. Some people prefer to cut cheesecake using cheese wire or dental floss, these cutting tools will also work very well.
Depending on the size of your cake, you may choose to cut it into 12 or 16 slices. If cutting the cake into 12 even slices, begin by cutting the cake into quarters, then cut each quarter into thirds. To yield 16 slices, cut the cake into quarters, cut each quarter in half, and each half into a half. Depending on how long the knife you will use is, the first slice made should either by cutting the cake completely in half, (or if the knife is not long enough) by placing the knife's point at the center of the cake.

To simplify removal of the cake slices, run a knife or spatula along the bottom of the cake between the crust and the pan before lifting the first slice upward, outward and onto a serving plate.

Happy Baking,
   Irene


SanLim    -- 10-01-2005 @ 2:32 AM
  Hi, Irene,
Thank you so much for your help. I have problems in baking bread with my machine. It does not turn out like a loaf of bread. It comes out very crispy on the surface and not fluffy like a normal white bread. I hope you can give me some tips on this. Thank you again. Hope to hear from you soon.



Enjoy Baking!


Irene    -- 10-01-2005 @ 3:53 AM
  Hello SanLim,

Have already posted the Bread Machine White Bread for you at the Baking Tips and Ideas section.You can find it under the topic Bread Machine by Oppss. Try the recipe and let us know how it turn out, ok. Thanks

Happy Baking,
    Irene


Joy    -- 10-20-2005 @ 11:33 AM
  Hi,
I found this website when I was searching for recipe for Japanese sponge like cheesecake. Thank you for the recipe and wonderful tips here. However, after baking it yesterday, I have several questions below. Hope to get some feedback.

Thank you,
Joy

1) Mixing the Egg white
a) The recipe says to whisk the egg white mixture. I did this using a hand-held mixer. Is this the same as whisking?
b) If hand held mixer is ok. At what speed should I mix the egg white? I mixed at low speed initially till foamy, then as I add in the sugar, I increased the speed to the highest. I did this because I read that mixing at high speed is to introduce more air which is the same effect as whisking.  
c) What is a soft peak? I know that as I mix the egg whites, it increases in volumne because of more air introduced. How do I test the peak softness?  Do I basically lift up some of the egg white mixture with a spoon and then drop it back to see if it is standing tall and hard or just fall softly back in a rather rounded mold?

2) Mixing the eggwhite and the cheese mixture
How do I mix the two together? I basically use the same folding method, but realise that at the end, the two mixture is not all well mixed cos after i baked, i could see lines like a marble cake caused by poor mixing, perhaps.

3) Baking tin
I do not have a round tin. Hence, I used a 8" square tin instead. Is this ok?

4) Baking heat & Collapsing cake top
My oven is known to be hotter than the conventional heat.  Hence, I lowered the heat to 250 F instead. I checked the cake after 50 mins and the top was all brown already. Hence, I took it out.  The cake top was beautifully puffed up. However, in about 5 mins, the cake top flattened down. Is this effect of flattening out normal? The end result is not as nice as the picture.

5) Lining the tin
Could I use aluminium foil to line the bottom instead of parchment paper?




Irene    -- 10-21-2005 @ 4:45 AM
  Hello Joy,

I will try my best to answer your questions.

1) Mixing the Egg white
a) The recipe says to whisk the egg white mixture. I did this using a hand-held mixer. Is this the same as whisking?

Answer: Yes you can use a hand-held mixer to whisk the egg white.

b) If hand held mixer is ok. At what speed should I mix the egg white? I mixed at low speed initially till foamy, then as I add in the sugar, I increased the speed to the highest. I did this because I read that mixing at high speed is to introduce more air which is the same effect as whisking.

Answer: Use high speed to whip the egg white and cream of tartar until frothy or foamy.At this stage add in the sugar a little at a time and continue beating until soft peak is form.

c) What is a soft peak? I know that as I mix the egg whites, it increases in volumne because of more air introduced. How do I test the peak softness?  Do I basically lift up some of the egg white mixture with a spoon and then drop it back to see if it is standing tall and hard or just fall softly back in a rather rounded mold?

Answer:The soft peak stage is reached when the peaks of the whites droop slightly, when the beater is turned off and lifted

2) Mixing the eggwhite and the cheese mixture
How do I mix the two together? I basically use the same folding method, but realise that at the end, the two mixture is not all well mixed cos after i baked, i could see lines like a marble cake caused by poor mixing, perhaps.

Answer: Use a whisk instead of spatula when folding in the cheese mixture to the egg white mixture. Stir in one direction until smooth and well combined

3) Baking tin
I do not have a round tin. Hence, I used a 8" square tin instead. Is this ok?

Answer: You can use either a square or round tin.

4) Baking heat & Collapsing cake top
My oven is known to be hotter than the conventional heat.  Hence, I lowered the heat to 250 F instead. I checked the cake after 50 mins and the top was all brown already. Hence, I took it out.  The cake top was beautifully puffed up. However, in about 5 mins, the cake top flattened down. Is this effect of flattening out normal? The end result is not as nice as the picture.

Answer:If the surface of the cake becomes too dark while baking, cover with a piece of aluminium foil.

5) Lining the tin
Could I use aluminium foil to line the bottom instead of parchment paper?

Answer:Haven't use an aluminium foil to line a cake tin before so I don't have the answer. You can always try it out and see the outcome.


    Happy Baking,
        Irene


Joy    -- 10-21-2005 @ 7:36 AM
  Hi Irene,

Thank you for replying so quickly. The answers are very clear and helpful.

I have some questions regarding egg beating. Could you help me to understand why I should not beat the egg white mixture till the peak is too high? I thought that by beating till the peak is higher, that will mean more air introduced, and hence a fluffier and lighter cake, isn't it?

Also, by overbeating the egg white, does it mean that the mixture will change from first frothy, than soft peak that increases in some volumne than to high peak in which it increases like 3 times in volumne. And what will happen if i beat somemore? This will move into overbeating stage where beating the mixture will have the opposite effect of beating down the mixture and hence, beating OUT the air instead?

I am a novice at baking and am trying to understand the rational for egg beating.  I guess that the best way for me to understand is to try out beating a few egg whites after your reply Smile  

Thank you,
Joy


Irene    -- 10-21-2005 @ 8:32 AM
 
Hi Joy,

Regarding your question on how to beat the egg white here is the website where you can learn more about it

http://www.baking911.com/pantry/eggs.htm



Happy Baking,
     Irene


Joy    -- 10-25-2005 @ 3:25 PM
  Hi Irene,
Thank you for the weblink. It was very helpful.

Would you or anyone else reading this have any suggestions on how I can 'jazz' up this cheesecake? I would like to add a glaze topping or something that will make this cheesecake more interesting, but at the same time, to be able to retain the texture and simple cotton soft nature of this cheesecake.

Thank you!

Joy


Kris    -- 10-25-2005 @ 3:36 PM
  Hi Joy,

I usually topped this cheesecake with apricot glaze. It's not too overpowering with just a bit of sweetness. My kinda taste Wink


Cheers,
Kris


Irene    -- 10-25-2005 @ 4:01 PM
  Hi Joy,
Kris has just answer your question. Thanks Kris. Joy do you know that Kris baked very beautiful Cotton Soft Japanese Cheesecake.Want you to see her cheesecake but unfortunately cannot access to the picture. Why Kris? Can you tell Joy how to access to your picture on the cheesecake.

  Happy Baking,
     Irene


Joy    -- 10-25-2005 @ 4:58 PM
  Hi Irene and Kris,

I love the idea of apricot glaze. But, how do I make it? Could you tell me?

Thank you!
Joy


Irene    -- 10-25-2005 @ 6:00 PM
  This how you can glaze your cheesecake. I don't know how Kris did hers and I do hope she can tell us.


Happy Baking,
     Irene

Glazing:
2 tbsp apricot jam (or whatever jam you like)
1/2 tbsp water

Put the jam and water in a sauce pan .With low heat stir the jam until dissolved



Joy    -- 10-27-2005 @ 8:02 AM
  Hi Irene,

Thanks for the glaze recipe. I will be baking the cake a second time tomorrow, and will top it off with the glaze this time round. Hope it will turn out well Smile

Joy


Joy    -- 10-29-2005 @ 7:35 PM
  Hi Irene,

Sad to say, my second attempt turned out to be a flop again. Like the previous time, it is too dense and not fluffy as it should be. I suspect that the height of the cake is probably half of what it should be. I suspect that the problem could be the following. Please let me know if you have any advice.

1) Overbeating of egg-white.
However, I thought that it seemed fine to me this time round.

2) Mixing of cream and egg-white mixture
From the 911baking website link that you gave previously, I read that when mixing mixtures together, one should always add the lighter to the heavier mixture.  For this recipe, I added the cream mixture into the eggwhite mixture and then mix it together by stirring with a whisk in one direction. Is this the right sequence for mixing the two mixtures?

3) Baking temperature & baking tin
I used a springform cake tin.  Like the last time, the baking temperature is at 250F (because my oven is normally hotter than usual).  After one hour, its still moist at the side so I put it back into the oven and covered the top with foil to prevent further browning.  Took it out after another 10mins and the cake seemed fully cooked. However, it is very dense.  There was no drastic deflating like the last time or any wrinkling.

Hope you could advise. I will try again and hopefully, can report it to be a success.

Lastly, I topped the cake with apricot glaze. I like the taste of it.

Regards,
Joy





Smile


ting    -- 10-31-2005 @ 5:38 AM
  Hi, Irene

I would like to ask whether it is suitable to place a thin layer of crusted biscuit/cookies at the base of the cheesecake? Please advice. Thanks.


ting    -- 10-31-2005 @ 6:13 AM
  Hi Irene,

Can I add instant coffee to make it a coffee cheese cake or make it to other flavor? And how?


ting    -- 10-31-2005 @ 6:35 AM
  Hi,

I would like to make a 9 inches cake. So I double the ingredient?


xavierbyf    -- 01-11-2006 @ 8:43 PM
  well, thanks for the lovely recipe. my girlfriend and i did it last 2 days and it turn out really good. just that egg taste stronger than the cream cheese and it is not sweet enough as well. the testure is great but how can i solve the problems as mention above? thanks.

xavier


Annakin    -- 01-08-2008 @ 7:11 PM
  I would like to find out where and when do you add salt i.e. to the cheese, flour or egg white mixture?  


Irene    -- 01-08-2008 @ 8:02 PM
  Add in the salt when you fold in the flours, egg yolks and lemon juice. Sorry I miss out on the salt. I have just edit the recipe.

Irene


Annakin    -- 01-08-2008 @ 9:42 PM
  Irene,

Thanks for that. I cant wait to try it out tonight.

Regards
Anna


TableBread    -- 01-09-2008 @ 6:51 PM
  Wow, so this post has been around for a while!  (I think the original post was 2004?!?)

So my question is:  Why is it called a 'Japanese' cheesecake?  I do not see a single Asian inspired ingredient.  I was just curious.

Cheers,

Tablebread

I can usually be found in the kitchen, everything else can be found here: http://tablebread.blogspot.com


Irene    -- 01-11-2008 @ 1:38 AM
  I am just as curious about why it is called ' Japanese Cheesecake'. Some said it is a cross between a cake and a souffle and that it was the Japanese who first made it. So that is how the Japanese Cheesecake came about. How true this is I can't say. So maybe Diana or someone out there has an answer.I am sure everyone is curious to know the correct anwer.

Irene


angelangsw    -- 11-10-2008 @ 2:42 AM
  Hi Irene,

I tried baking ur japanese cheesecake and it came out wonderfully except
it started to crack a little in the middle during cooling. Frown  But it still tastes
great, thank you very much.

I would like to ask for your suggestion regarding flavouring. What would
you suggest I do if I want to make the cake chocolate flavoured instead?




angelangsw    -- 11-12-2008 @ 7:29 AM
  oh well.. can anyone give me some suggestions?? i replaced one ounce of
cake flour with cocoa powder. The cake came out with a huge crack in the
middle and it was kinda pudding-like.. no cheese taste at all! yikes!


Irene    -- 11-12-2008 @ 7:01 PM
  Hi Angel,
Sorry for the late reply. Rather busy lately. Well about the flavouring. Sorry to tell you I havn't try baking this cheesecake with chocolate flavour yet so I can't help you on that.

But maybe you can try this. Add a teaspoon of chocolate paste to the milk and don't add the lemon juice. Maybe this might work. Good Luck



Irene

This message was edited by Irene on 11-12-08 @ 7:02 PM


angelangsw    -- 11-12-2008 @ 7:39 PM
  Alright, i'm gg to try tt out again today! finished my chocolate version
alrdy haha..thanks so much..


Lydia    -- 11-26-2008 @ 6:46 AM
  I baked this cake few times (same recipe but from another site), it tasted great. The texture was light and soft.

My friends tried the same recipe and liked it, one of them baked marble (cheese & choc) version.

cheers,
Lydia Teh
My Kitchen


momoblues21    -- 11-30-2008 @ 8:36 AM
  Hi Irene!


I'm a very new baker and just chanced upon Diana's Desserts. Anyway, before I embark on baking this lovely cheesecake, I wanted to ask if there are any possible substitutes to corn flour. This is because I don't bake extremely often, but corn flour comes in large quantities in the supermarkets here.

Yup so I'd like to avoid wastage as much as possible. Please help me with this! Thanks (:


- Cheryl


Irene    -- 12-01-2008 @ 4:28 AM
  Hi Cheryl,
  NIce to know that you going to try this cake  Smile
Hope you like it as much as I do.

Sorry to tell you that I don't know any possible substitutes for corn flour.As far as I know corn flour gives baked goods a lighter texture.

There are many cheese cakes which do not used corn flour so I guess you can omit it in this cheese cake too. So give this recipe a try and see how you like it.

Happy Baking

Irene


LindaWong    -- 02-12-2009 @ 11:13 PM
  Dear Irene,

Yesterday, I just tried to go to your website looking
for the Cotton Cheese Cake, and so your recipe appear
as Japanese Cotton Cheese Cake.  So I and my sister
tried baking it and it was so successful and look
fantastic just like the expertise make in bakery shop.
So she told me I must reply and comment to you for how
good is your recipe and it taste very nice as well as
it looks.  Her husband even gave us a pass for our
first attempt.

We even want to try on your other recipes next time
and I have even print out the recipe and photo-copies
to my friends and colleagues.

Thank you so much.

WarmestRegards
LINDA


vprimush    -- 09-17-2009 @ 2:23 PM
  Hi Irene and Diana,

thank you for providing the recipe.
I have baked the recipe today and I have some questions, hope you can help or other people in the forum.
1. How should I mix the cheese mixture with the fluor mixture? with a mixer?
2. I was told that philadelphia creme cheese has the same taste as US creme cheese. After I baked the cake, I found out that the egg smell is more dominant than the cheese, do you have any suggestion to solve this problem? btw: I lived in germany.

thank you in advance.

vprimush


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